Responsibilities of Breeding

October 23rd marked Ruby’s first birthday so only one more year until we can breed her. (Don’t worry we spoiled Ruby with homemade pupcakes and a squeaky stuffed animal.)

Happy First Birthday Ruby! 20131023_193100

Breeding a dog is a decision that should not be taken lightly by any pet owner and there are many things to consider especially with crossbred dogs.

For example:

  • Crossbred dogs can have a unique look. With goldendoodles you cannot predict their coat, color, or size exactly, but they are all very pretty dogs.
  • Careful crossbreeding can lower the chance of congenital issues if the breeder picks the dam and stud wisely.
  • It is hard to judge what size the dog will be. This can be an issue with some new owners if they have smaller living quarters or wanted a certain sized dog. Goldendoodles will range in size and are dependent on their mothers’ and fathers’ traits.
  • Temperaments can be difficult to predict. Although Goldendoodles are known for their docile temperament, that doesn’t mean that crossbreeding other types of dogs is a win-win situation.
  • There can be a potential for higher risk deliveries, mostly because the dogs are of different sizes. Sometimes the dam will have to have a c-section so her and her puppies survive.

Puppies

Some more serious things to consider with breeding are:

  • A Dam’s health is very important every step of the way. With the dam getting pregnant, there is a chance she might not make it through or there could be complications with the delivery. The dam should have a vet exam to make sure they are in a healthy condition to get pregnant, they will need pre and post-natal vitamins and care.
  • A breeder will need to dedicate at least 130 hours to raise an average litter. The mother  should not be left alone during whelping and a few days after. The breeder will also need time for paperwork, caring for the dam, puppies, socialization, and interviewing prospective families for the puppies.
  • The breeder should not be in if for the money, or lack there of. I found a great website that breaks down the cost of the breeding process, take a look here.

To become a reputable breeder I will need to look into each perspective owner that wants a puppy. They will need to fill out a puppy application and sign a puppy agreement form. If for some reason the new owner does not think the puppy fits with their family anymore or they want to sell their puppy, I will be the first person they contact and take the puppy back. I am responsible for these puppies and making sure they have good homes and a incredible life to live.

Would any of you think about breeding, why or why not?

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